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Crocodile chelou by ZeWqt Crocodile chelou by ZeWqt
Une reconstitution spéculative du Crocodilien Africain Crocodylus niloticus (crocodile du Nil, pour ceux qui seraient allergiques aux noms binominaux). Oui, il a subi le même traitement que certaines reconstitutions d'animaux éteints, et on dirait un peu un Ambulocetus. Je veux bien qu'on spécule, c'est bien la spéculation, surtout en l'absence de données, mais parfois, ça à l'air d'aller trop loin.

A speculative reconstruction of the African Crocodilian Crocodylus niloticus (Nile crocodile, for the ones who have an allergy to the binomial names). Yes, it suffered from the same treatment than some reconstitution of extinct animals, and it somewhat looks like an Ambulocetus. I have nothing against speculation, speculation is a good thing, especially in absence of proper data, but sometimes, it seems it go too far.

The title means "fishy crocodile" by the way.
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:iconcommando252:
Commando252 Featured By Owner 6 days ago
People reconstructing Spinosaurus.
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2015
The funny thing is crocodilians have a dormant gene for feather growth just like birds. Looks like dinosaurs are fluffier than we thought.
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:iconzewqt:
ZeWqt Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, it's a fascinating fact! I think that feathers appeared early among the Archosaurs but in some animals, these feathers evolved in thing that look like scales, just like in the feet of birds, but you know, it's just a personnal theory.
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner May 9, 2015
It's actually been proven that crocodilian scales are unlike other reptile scales. Lizard and snake scales are formed in the epidermis, while those of crocodilians and turtles are formed deeper in the dermis and do not overlap. In fact the proper term to describe these scales is "scutes".
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:icondjigr:
Djigr Featured By Owner May 1, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
This makes me excited for some reason.
If you have a link to a research on this, I'd be delighted! Did they identify the gene as in "oh, this section of the genome is the same as in birds, and we know in birds it is for feather growth", or did they activate the gene in embryos and got feathery crocodiles?
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner May 1, 2015
Here's the National Geographic article that published it. They do not state whether or not they activated it in croc embryos. 

ngm.nationalgeographic.com/201…
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:icondabrandonsphere:
DaBrandonSphere Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I have nothing against speculation, speculation is a good thing, especially in absence of proper data, but sometimes, it seems it go too far.

I would draw the line at passing off one's own speculations or artistic preferences as fact that everyone else must kowtow. Especially if there's data around that contradicts your pet speculations.
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:iconzewqt:
ZeWqt Featured By Owner May 20, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I think a lot of people (myself included) will still cross the line, because speculation is a funny thing to do! :D
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:iconplastospleen:
PLASTOSPLEEN Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015
Reminds me of a platypus...
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:iconzewqt:
ZeWqt Featured By Owner May 20, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, it looks very mammalian reconstructed this way! :)
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:iconmidiaou:
Midiaou Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Nice spec;)
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:iconzewqt:
ZeWqt Featured By Owner May 20, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks! At first, I wanted to add a comb and some nice boldly colored wattles but then, I just said "nah, whiskers would be enough!"
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:iconmidiaou:
Midiaou Featured By Owner May 21, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Naaah, honestly, it's good enough like that. No more need:)
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April 24, 2015
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